Birdengine is the ever-evolving musical project of Lawry Joseph Tilbury, whose unique music has been described by The Independent as 'rustic-mythic weirdness' and by Uncut as 'wonderfully atmospheric'. 

 

Having released two EP's of experimental melodies and field recordings on Scottish label Benbecula in 2005 (described by Stylus Magazine as 'The first relevant work of freak-folktronica'), Tilbury went on to release the mini-album 'I Fed Thee Rabbit Water' on Drift in 2007 ('a 25 minute pastoral masterpiece’ The Independent). The self-produced debut saw Tilbury take his sound on a different musical journey with a collection of sparse-sounding imagery-led mystic horror folk including the introduction of Spanish Guitar and Tilbury's unique vocal delivery. 

 

With 2011's 'The Crooked Mile' Birdengine created a grander sounding collection of hypnotic, pastoral and woeful songs with a full band sound and an expanded selection of instruments, The Quietus describes it as 'Haunted, dry-ditch dirges mix with soaring melodies' and UNCUT said 'it whirls like a waltz for the dead - the results are unmistakable and unsettling'

 

Following a 10 year hiatus and relocation to the sleepy seaside town of Seaford, Birdengine released his third album SOMNAM in 2021. Another change in musical direction, SOMNAM contains themes of grief, sleep and nostalgia and utilises tape loops, vocal sampling, warped distorted synthesis and organic rhythms created using found sound. Later that year Tilbury released the mini-album BRUTAL, a collection of 9 very different pieces from solo piano sketches to distorted heavy synth via church organ and field recordings.

 

'...an unknown supernatural force..'

WARP

 

'nervy pastoral loneliness'

Word Magazine

 

'...exists in its own universe, both of our world and distinctly other.'

The Quiteus

 

'...magically creepy and sparsely epic, capturing the imagination...'

Americana UK

 

'...like visiting a museum of curiosities.......the songs are full of rustic-mythic weirdness...'

The Independent

 

'Both unnerving and intriguing, in equal measures.'

Maverick Magazine